How To: Create an Editable and Savable Forest Practices Application

Hello good readers of the SFLO Newsletter! As the compiler and publisher of this here newsletter, I’ve been too busy wrangling articles from our foresters, biologists and assorted specialists to write an article of my own. But lately several small forest landowners have made me aware of some of the various technical issues they encounter using our DNR webpage, software and tools related to forest practices. Starting now, I intend to write an intermittent series describing how to best utilize some of the tools found through our DNR webpage. First up is a discussion on creating a Forest Practices Application in PDF format that you can edit and save to your computer.

Many folks have called lately with issues related to adding their information to a Forest Practices Application on our website, saving it but then finding that their edits didn’t actually save. There’s nothing worse than working on something for a few hours, just to find out that it didn’t save properly and you lost everything. Here’s how to get around that issue:

  1. First and most crucial: Ensure you have Adobe Reader, a free downloadable program that allows you to open, read and save PDF (portable document format) files. Note: DNR makes no attestations to the validity of software you download. Make sure you’re getting a legit copy of the software by downloading and don’t download anything suspicious).
  2. Open the FPA/N (we’ve selected the form for Western Washington) by clicking on this link.
  3. DON’T ADD ANY TEXT TO THIS FPA YET! You first need to save the PDF to your computer, and then open it through Adobe Reader.
  4. If you’re using the Google Chrome browser: In the upper right corner of the screen (see image below), there’s a tiny arrow with a line under it. Click that, and a box will open asking you where you want to save the document. Save it to your computer’s desktop or wherever else is most convenient for you.
    Download" control in the Google Chrome browser
    Red arrow (upper right corner) points to the document “Download” control in the Google Chrome browser.

     

  5. If you’re using the Internet Explorer browser (see below): Look in the upper left corner of the screen for a small button image that looks like a computer floppy disk. Click that, and a box will open asking you where you want to save the document. Save it to your computer’s desktop or wherever else is most convenient for you.
     "Download" control in the Microsoft Internet Explorer browser.
    Red arrow (upper left corner) points to the document “Download and Save” control in the Microsoft Internet Explorer browser.

     

  6. Next, look in your computer’s list of programs (the example below shows a Windows 10 display). Find and open the Adobe Reader program that you installed on your computer.

    The free Adobe Reader program
    The free Adobe Reader software.
  7. Now that Adobe is open, you need to open your recently saved FPA document. To do this, click “File” in the upper left hand corner of the screen (see below) and then click “Open.” Navigate to where you saved the FPA and click “Open.”
  8. You should now see the blank FPA open in Adobe Reader. Having the document open in the Adobe Reader program instead of your internet browser allows you to edit and save the PDF to your computer.
  9. Give it a try. Type your name into the FPA’s “Landowner” box as a test. Then save the document: in the upper right corner of the screen, click “File” and then “Save As.” Save with a different name than what you called it as a blank document. An example might be “Blank FPA YourLastName.”
  10. Once it saves, close the document, and then reopen it. Your name should still be on the document and you should feel like a huge success for successfully navigating DNR’s online forms! You’re good to continue the rest of the FPA with the knowledge that you won’t lose all of your work.
  11. If this doesn’t work for you and you’re still wildly frustrated, feel free to email me or call at 360-902-1849. Additionally, if you have further ideas for topics of future how-to articles, please let me know. Thanks for reading.

By Josh Meek – Technical Assistance Forester, DNR Small Forest Landowner Office, joshua.meek@dnr.wa.gov

Events, Workshops and Publications

Forestland Resiliency – Meeting Future Challenges

Saturday, Aug. 5, 2017
72 Tornquist Road, McCleary, WA 98557
No charge to attend but reservations are requested

Tour a small, locally owned forest and learn about the biggest issues for local forests: threat of conversion, climate change, and biodiversity loss–with a focus on what landowners should know and actions they can be taking today to address these issues. Presenters will include Andrea Watts, a local forest landowner, science writer and editor on numerous forestry related issues; and experts in forest pathology, forest genetics and other disciplines from the Washington State Department of Natural Resources.

 

Forest and Range Owners Field Days

These popular, out-in-the-woods, family-friendly events are designed for small forest landowners. They feature outdoor classes and workshops on tree planting, weed control, thinning, tree diseases, mushroom-growing and much more…

 

Forest Stewardship Coached Planning

If you own wooded property, our flagship course will teach you how to assess your trees, avoid insect and disease problems, and attract wildlife. Experts will help you develop your own Forest Stewardship Plan to keep your woods on track to provide enjoyment and income for years to come.

  • Preston (King County) starting Sept. 12, 2017
  • Sedro Woolley (Skagit County) starting Sept. 28, 2017
  • Southwest Washington, locations and dates to be announced, Fall 2017. Contact andyp@wsu.edu
  • Stevens County, location and date to be announced, Fall 2017. Contact andyp@wsu.edu

 

Invasive Forest Weed Control Field Practicums, 2017–2018

These practicums are completely field based and centered around hands-on learning. Learn to identify and control some of the most common invasive weeds that cause economic and environmental damage in forests using chemical (including organic-approved) and non-chemical control options

Practicum 1
Arlington – Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Future practicums:

 

Managing Red Alder

This two-day workshop (which includes a field trip) for property owners will take a comprehensive look at the challenges and opportunities that red alder presents to landowners.

Arlington  Oct. 6-7, 2017

 

TIES TO THE LAND: A Facilitated Workshop on Succession Planning

Keeping Family Forests, Farms, and Ranches in the Family

Few challenges that family forestland owners, farmers, ranchers, and other land-based family businesses face are more important than the issue of passing the business and its land base on to the following generation. Many small landowners want to preserve their family lands but don’t know how to involve family members in ownership and operation of their small land-based businesses.

This facilitated workshop focuses on ways to maintain family ties to the land from generation to generation, and is a mix of presentations and practical exercises to help families address tough issues. Each family will receive a copy of the Ties to the Land workbook which is designed to help families continue to improve and direct their communications at home. Topics covered will also be relevant to professionals working with landowner families. More information is available on the Ties to the Land website.

Ilwaco – Saturday, Oct. 21  115 Lake St, Ilwaco.

For more information, contact Andy Perleberg, (509) 667-6540, andyp@wsu.edu

Note:  Dates and locations for Ties to the Land workshops are determined by community interest.  Contact Andy Perleberg at WSU Extension, 509-667-6540, or email andyp@wsu.edu for more information (and to campaign for us to schedule a class near you).

 

Find schedules and information about upcoming education opportunities on the WSU Extension Forestry website: forestry.wsu.edu/

 

New Publication: Homeowners’ Guide to Landslides

The Washington Geological Survey, in partnership with the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral industries, has published a Homeowners’ Guide to Landslides. It is available on the Washington Geological Survey’s webpage for download at no charge.

Find out more about landslides in Washington.

 

McCleary Coached Planning Course a Huge Success

coached planning
DNR and WSU Extension offer multi-week courses for landowners interested in developing forest management plans.

WSU Extension and Washington DNR recently concluded an 8-week coached planning course in Grays Harbor County where 31 families improved their understanding of forest ecosystems, the importance of active forest management and how to become even better stewards of their own forestland. The course covered a multitude of topics, including forest ecology, management and health, wildlife habitat and the harvest of non-wood products such as edibles.

Field Day Learning About Wildlife

Class participants were enthusiastic about what they learned and excited to implement these newly acquired skills and understanding across their forestland. We’d love to have you join us at one of our upcoming courses.

The next scheduled Forest Stewardship Coached Planning course starts on Saturday March 11 in Friday Harbor (San Juan County). More information about this course.

Unfortunately, the 2017 Online Coach Planning class is full. Check the WSU Extension Forestry calendar web page for future offerings of this and other classes — online or face-to-face — and find links to publications, videos and other resources.

Tax Tips for Forest Landowners for the 2016 Tax Year

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has published its annual tax tips for forest landowners. Current as of Sept. 30, 2016, this publication provides up-to-date federal income tax information affecting timber transactions and is intended to assist woodland owners, logging professionals, foresters and their tax accountants in filing the 2016 tax returns. Click to view or download this report.

Events, Workshops and Publications

Invasive Weed Control Expo

Learn to identify and control some of the most common invasive weeds that plague forest landowners, including: holly, ivy, blackberries, knotweed, reed canary grass, and Scotch broom.

Forest Stewardship Coached Planning

If you own wooded property, our flagship course will teach you how to assess your trees, avoid insect and disease problems, and attract wildlife. State experts will help you develop your own Forest Stewardship Plan to keep your woods on track to provide enjoyment and income for years to come.

  • Newport (focus on eastern Washington forestland issues) — Tuesdays, Jan. 10, 2017, to Feb. 28, 2017 (also available via computer streaming for snowbirds and absentee landowners) More information  Early registration discount ends Dec. 1, 2016
  • Online (focus on western Washington forestland issues) — Tuesdays, Jan. 24, 2017, to March 7, 2017. (High-speed internet connection required). Early registration discount ends Jan. 10, 2017More information
  • Friday Harbor, Saturdays, March 11, 2017, to April 8, 2017. More information

How to Manage a Timber Sale

Chehalis — 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, Jan, 21, 2017, at the O’Neill Pine Professional Center. More information and registration

Portland, Ore. — 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 4, 2017, at Sauvie Island Grange. More information and registration 

 

Workshops coming in 2017

  • 25th Annual Family Foresters Workshop, January 20, 2017, Spokane
  • 2017 Logger’s Workshop, March 22, 2017, Ag and Trade Center, Colville

New Publication

Washington State Consulting Forester and Silvicultural Contractor Directory

A compilation of forestry professionals around Washington state who provide professional services to private forest landowners. Published by WSU Extension Forestry. Click here to view or download the directory

Events, workshops and publications

Northwest Natural Resource Group Workshop Series (The Beginning Forestry Program)
You Bought a Forest, So Now What?

Chehalis — Saturday, April 23, 2016

This workshop will introduce forest owners to Pacific Northwest ecology and provide key information for starting to assess and manage woodlands. Topics this class will cover include: Forest ecology, tree identification, inventory approaches and options to assess forest health, tree stocking, invasive species, and wildlife habitat, mapping tools, current use taxation, local resources, technical assistance, and much more.

Event and registration information

 

Firewise Communities Workshop

Spokane (Spokane County) — May 17-18

“The best time to become Firewise is before the next fire starts…” Find out what steps to take to protect your home and neighborhood from wildfires, what resources are available to help you, and what we have learned from our recent wildfire seasons.

More information

 

Northwest Natural Resource Group Workshop Series (The Beginning Forestry Program)
Ecological Forestry 101; Intro to Silviculture & Wildlife Habitat

 

Oakville — Saturday, June 11, 2016

Many forest owners in the Pacific Northwest are interested in maintaining forests that provide a broad range of economic and ecological values. This workshop will introduce you to the principles of ecological forestry as well as tools to implement it successfully on smaller parcels. Topics include: Forest dynamics, forest health, young stand management, uneven-aged management, hardwood management, maintaining & enhancing wildlife habitat, and much more.

Event and registration information

 

2016 Forest Owner’s Field Day: Eastern Washington

Colville — Saturday June 25, 2016
Brochure, registration, schedule coming soon
Check WSU Extension Forestry for updates

 

2016 Forest Owner’s Field Day: Western Washington

Sequim — Saturday August 20, 2016
Brochure, registration, schedule coming soon
Check WSU Extension Forestry for updates

 

Forest Stewardship Coached Planning

If you own wooded property, this course will teach you how to assess your trees, avoid insect and disease problems, and attract wildlife. State experts will help you develop your own Forest Stewardship Plan to keep your woods on track to provide enjoyment and income for years to come.

Deming (Whatcom County) — Thursday evenings, September 15 – November 3
More information

Preston (King County) — Tuesday evenings, September 27 – November 15
More information

Events, Workshops and Publications

Workshops

Forest Stewardship Coached Planning – WSU’s flagship course teaches landowners how to assess your trees, avoid insect and disease problems, and attract wildlife. State experts will help you develop your own Forest Stewardship Plan to keep your woods on track to provide enjoyment and income for years to come.

  • Liberty Lake (Spokane County) – Wednesday evenings, starting September 16
  • Preston – Tuesday evenings starting September 22.
  • Langley – Thursday evenings starting October 8.

Forest Owners Field Days – Field days feature a whole suite of our most popular forest stewardship workshops. The state’s top forestry specialists will be offering hands-on field sessions throughout the day on a variety of topics that will help you to better understand, protect, enhance, and enjoy your forest.

Online

Forest Stewardship University offers a complete online education experience, featuring over 20 mini-courses ranging from forest health to taxes.

Publications

Forestry Education and Assistance for Washington Forest Landowners – A directory of key agencies and contacts for forest owners throughout Washington.

Small-scale Sawmill Directory – These databases provide a partial listing of sawmills that accept small quantities of logs:

Websites

Forest Seedling Network – An interactive website that connects landowners with seedling providers, forest management services and contractors.

Woodland Fish and Wildlife – A cooperative effort between state and federal agencies and universities to provide woodland owners with wildlife management information. The 21 publications cover topics as varied as cavity nesting ducks to wildlife found in white oak woodlands.

Women Owning Woodlands – The Women Owning Woodlands web project strives to bring topical, accessible, and current forestry information to woodland owners and forest practitioners through news articles, blogs, events, resources, and personal stories.