FPA/N Questions & Answers

Question: When will applicants be required to use the July 10, 2012 Forest Practices Application/Notification (FPA/N) forms?

Answer: Applicants will be able to submit FPA/Ns using the September 25, 2009, May 1, 2012, or July 10, 2012 versions of the form until August 31, 2012. The July 10, 2012 version of the FPA/N must be used beggining September 1, 2012.

Question: If an FPA/N is incomplete, withdrawn or disapproved, can the fee amount be refunded?

Answer: No, the Forest Practices can no longer refund FPA/N fees.

Question: If a landowner submits an FPA/N via the mail along with a fee amount that is too much, can the excess amount be refunded?

Answer: No, Forest Practices can no longer refund FPA/N fees, even if the landowner over paid.

Question: Will applicants be able to apply the fee amount from a withdrawn or disapproved FPA/N towards a replacement FPA/N?

Answer: Yes, under certain circumstances between July 10, 2012 and July 1, 2013. The new FPA/N is:

– In the same location as the original

– Accepted by DNR within 45 days of the disapproval

– For a first resubmittal only

Question: Can a landowner receive more than one three year renewal?

Answer: No, a single three year renewal is allowed by the law.

Renewals: (effective 7/10/2012) RCW 76.09.060(6)(b) A notification or application may be renewed for an additional three-year term by the filing and approval of a notification or application, as applicable, prior to the expiration of the original application or notification. A renewal application or notification is subject to the forest practices rules in effect at the time the renewal application or notification is filed. Nothing in this section precludes the applicant from applying for a new application or notification after the renewal period has lapsed.

Question: If a FPA/N renewal request is submitted on or after July 10, 2012, what is the fee and how long is the renewal granted for?

Answer: Fee of $150 is charged and the renewal time period is three additional years after the current expiration date. Unless the original FPA is from a small forest landowner that harvests on a single contiguous ownership consisting of one or more parcels, the fee is $100.

Question: What is a contiguous parcel?

Answer: RCW 79.09.020(7) defines: “contiguous” as land adjoining or touching by a common corner or otherwise. Land having common ownership divided by a road or other right-of-way shall be considered contiguous.

Question: If a landowner submits a single FPA/N showing harvest on two separate (non-contiguous) parcels, what fee is charged?

Answer: $150.00 The FPA/N instructions will require applicants to provide additional information on a map in some situations. See FPA/N question number 3, long-term application step 1, question 2.

RCW 76.09.065(2)(b)(i)(A) states in part “when the application or notification is submitted by a landowner who satisfies the definition of a small forest landowner provided in RCW 76.09.450 and the application or notification applies to a single contiguous ownership consisting of one or more parcels”

Question: Why do small forest landowner applicants need to submit a map showing their ownership?

Answer: RCW 76.09.065(2)(b)(i)(A) states in part “when the application or notification is submitted by a landowner who satisfies the definition of small forest landowner provided in RCW 76.09.450 and the application or notification applies to a single contiguous ownership consisting of one or more parcels”

Question: RCW 76.09.450 provides exceptions for small landowners to harvest more than two million board feet per year. What information does the landowner submit to DNR? When is this information submitted?

Answer: A written statement from the landowner that establishes the moneys will be used for medical bills, taxes, or other need. The statement needs to be submitted with the application.

Small forest landowner definition: RCW 76.09.450 For the purposes of this chapter and RCW 76.13.150 and 77.12.755, “small forest landowner” means an owner of forest land who, at the time of submission of required documentation to the department, has harvested from his or her own lands in this state no more than an average timber volume of two million board feet per year during the three years prior to submitting documentation to the department and who certifies that he or she does not expect to harvest from his or her own lands in the state more than an average timber volume of two million board feet per year during the ten years following the submission of documentation to the department. However, any landowner who exceed the two million board feet annual average timber harvest threshold from their land in the tree years prior to submitting documentation to the department, or who expects to exceed the threshold during any of the following ten years, shall still be deemed a “small forest landowner” if he or she establishes to the department’s reasonable satisfaction that the harvest limits were, or will be, exceeded in order to raise funds to pay estate taxes or for an equally compelling and unexpected obligation, such as for a court-ordered judgment or for extraordinary medical expenses.